We use cookies to enhance your experience on our website. By continuing to use our website, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. You can change your cookie settings at any time. Find out more Central Asia, Islam in - Oxford Islamic Studies Online
Select Translation What is This? Selections include: The Koran Interpreted, a translation by A.J. Arberry, first published 1955; The Qur'an, translated by M.A.S. Abdel Haleem, published 2004; or side-by-side comparison view
Chapter: verse lookup What is This? Select one or both translations, then enter a chapter and verse number in the boxes, and click "Go."
:
  • Previous Result
  • Results
  • Highlight On / Off
  • Look It Up What is This? Highlight any word or phrase, then click the button to begin a new search.
  • Next Result

Central Asia, Islam in

Source:
The Oxford Dictionary of Islam What is This? Covers the religious, political, and social spheres of global Islam in the modern world

    Central Asia, Islam in

    Present-day Armenia, Azerbaijan, Chechnya, Dagestan, Georgia, and Abkhazia comprise the region historically known as the Caucasus; Central Asia proper consists of Uzbekistan, Kazakhstan, Kyrgyzstan, Tajikistan, and Turkmenistan, but the two regions share many affinities. Most Muslims in the region are Sunni and follow the Hanafi school, though Shiism can be found among the Azeris, Ironis, and Tats of Dagestan. The majority are Turkic peoples; exceptions include the Uighurs and Kazakhs in Chinese Xinjiang and the Tajiks, who are ethnically and linguistically Indo-Iranian. By the mid-seventh century, conquering Arabs had imposed Islamic rule in the eastern Caucasus. From 800 to 1200 Islam spread further through merchants and traders. By the mid-sixteenth century Crimea, the southern Russian steppes, the Kazakh steppes, and western Siberia had come under Islamic law. Russia began conquest of the region in the sixteenth century. Sufi brotherhoods were important in preserving Islam during Russian domination and in many areas led the struggle against Russian rule. The Qadiri order in particular gave birth to several militant Sufi organizations that forcibly opposed Russian rule until the disintegration of the Soviet Union, treating the struggle as a jihad.

    See also Kazakhstan, Islam in; Kyrgyzstan, Islam in; Tajikistan, Islam in; Turkmenistan, Islam in; Uzbekistan, Islam in

    • Previous Result
    • Results
    • Highlight On / Off
    • Look It Up What is This? Highlight any word or phrase, then click the button to begin a new search.
    • Next Result
    Oxford University Press

    © 2019. All Rights Reserved. Cookie Policy | Privacy Policy | Legal Notice