We use cookies to enhance your experience on our website. By continuing to use our website, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. You can change your cookie settings at any time. Find out more Conseil Français du Culte Musulman (CFCM) - Oxford Islamic Studies Online
Select Translation What is This? Selections include: The Koran Interpreted, a translation by A.J. Arberry, first published 1955; The Qur'an, translated by M.A.S. Abdel Haleem, published 2004; or side-by-side comparison view
Chapter: verse lookup What is This? Select one or both translations, then enter a chapter and verse number in the boxes, and click "Go."
:
  • Previous Result
  • Results
  • Highlight On / Off
  • Look It Up What is This? Highlight any word or phrase, then click the button to begin a new search.
  • Next Result

Conseil Français du Culte Musulman (CFCM)

By:
Danièle Joly, Jaber Ferhat
Source:
The Oxford Encyclopedia of the Islamic World What is This? Provides comprehensive scholarly coverage of the full geographical and historical extent of Islam

Conseil Français du Culte Musulman (CFCM)

The Conseil Français du Culte Musulman (French Council for the Muslim Faith, or CFCM), founded in May 2003, is the main body representing the French Muslim community, which numbers 4 million, the largest in Europe.

The French authorities began in the 1980s to attempt to set up a representative body of Muslims in France that would, as with other religions, be recognized as an official interlocutor with the French state. The Algerian-controlled Paris Mosque had played this role, but its monopoly came under growing criticism as young French-born Muslims did not identify with it. Another objective was to reduce the control of foreign countries and to minimize the potential spread of international radical Islam (Joly, 2007).

The predecessor of the CFCM was the short-lived Conseil Représentatif sur l’Islam en France, created in 1989. It was succeeded in October 1999 by the Conseil National des Français Musulmans. It laid the foundations for the CFCM, but negotiations were delayed by differences between the Muslim federations and interference from foreign governments.

In December 2002, Interior Minister Nicolas Sarkozy secured an agreement among the three major federations—the Mosque of Paris, the Union des Organisations Islamiques de France (UOIF), and the Fédération Nationale des Musulmans de France (FMNF)—at a conference at Nainville-les-Roches. The CFCM officially came into being on May 3, 2003.

According to its charter, the CFCM pledges to defend the dignity and the interests of the Muslim faith in France, to foster and organize the sharing of information and services among places of religious worship, to encourage dialogue between faith communities, and to provide representation for places of Muslim worship in dealings with the authorities (Statuts du Conseil Français du Culte Musulman). The CFCM helps to develop and implement policies in areas where religious observance meets the public domain. It consults with the French government over Muslim dietary regulations, the building of mosques, and the training of imams and chaplains.

The CFCM is an umbrella organization composed of an eight-member Governing Board, an Administrative Council, a General Assembly, and twenty-five Muslim Regional Councils (CRCMs). The General Assembly is made up of 150 members, three-quarters of whom are elected. The rest include twenty-four delegates from the seven constituent federations, ten from the five largest mosques, and ten appointed by the Executive Board.

The composition of the CFCM reflects the diversity of French Muslim communities along national, ethnic, and sectarian lines. It includes representation from the French Muslim communities originating in Algeria, sub-Saharan Africa, the French West Indies, and Turkey.

The CFCM was involved in implementing the March 2004 law banning visible religious symbols in schools. It undertook negotiations to free French journalists held hostage in Iraq in September 2004. It intervened in the youth riots in the fall of 2005; helps to train imams and raise funds for the construction of mosques without interference from foreign sponsors; and has begun to address concrete issues of religious observance and racial discrimination. However, it does not appear to hold much relevance for younger Muslims.

The CFCM often seems to walk a narrow line between the Muslim communities and the state. Only time will tell whether it succeeds in its stated mission.

See also CONSEIL NATIONAL DES FRANçAIS MUSULMANS; FéDéRATION NATIONALE DES MUSULMANS DE FRANCE; FRANCE; and UNION DES ORGANISATIONS ISLAMIQUES DE FRANCE.

Bibliography

  • Baubérot, Jean. La laïcité en question. Paris: IFRI, 2004. Find it in your Library
  • Laurence, Jonathan. “From the Elysée Salon to the Table of the Republic.”French Politics, Culture and Society23, no. 1 (Spring 2005): 52. Find it in your Library
  • Statuts du Conseil Français du Culte Musulman CFCM. www.cfcm.info. Find it in your Library
  • Previous Result
  • Results
  • Highlight On / Off
  • Look It Up What is This? Highlight any word or phrase, then click the button to begin a new search.
  • Next Result
Oxford University Press

© 2020. All Rights Reserved. Cookie Policy | Privacy Policy | Legal Notice