We use cookies to enhance your experience on our website. By continuing to use our website, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. You can change your cookie settings at any time. Find out more Gasprinskii, Ismail Bey - Oxford Islamic Studies Online
Select Translation What is This? Selections include: The Koran Interpreted, a translation by A.J. Arberry, first published 1955; The Qur'an, translated by M.A.S. Abdel Haleem, published 2004; or side-by-side comparison view
Chapter: verse lookup What is This? Select one or both translations, then enter a chapter and verse number in the boxes, and click "Go."
:
  • Previous Result
  • Results
  • Highlight On / Off
  • Look It Up What is This? Highlight any word or phrase, then click the button to begin a new search.
  • Next Result

Gasprinskii, Ismail Bey

Source:
The Islamic World: Past and Present What is This? Accessible coverage of Islam from the seventh century to the twenty-first century

    Gasprinskii, Ismail Bey

    1851 – 1914 Crimean Tatar reformer

    Ismail Bey Gasprinskii was born in a small village on the Crimean Peninsula, in what is now the southern Ukraine. His family had served in the Russian military for generations. As a teenager, Gasprinskii attended a military academy in Moscow before spending three years abroad, living in Vienna, Paris, and Istanbul. Returning to Russia, Gasprinskii taught Russian to Crimean Muslims and, from 1878 to 1882 , he served as mayor of the Crimean city of Bakhchisaray.

    Gasprinskii was an ethnic Turk who dedicated his life to helping Muslims overcome cultural and economic obstacles. He wrote widely about the problems facing Turkish Muslims in Russia. In 1883 he started a newspaper called The Interpreter. Appearing in Turkish and Russian, it became one of the most influential Turkish newspapers in Russia. Gasprinskii used his newspaper to urge Russian Turks to adopt new, more modern, ways of thinking.

    Gasprinskii's ideas inspired the Jadidism (modernism) movement. He encouraged Muslims to borrow from European traditions in order to restore their own culture and unify all Muslims. He believed that technology was necessary for advancement and he advocated education that included science, mathematics, and other practical subjects. He also promoted greater equality for women.

    Despite his calls for change, Gasprinskii remained committed to the basic principles of Islam. Gasprinskii also believed that a common Turkic language would strengthen Russian Muslim society. He worked to promote literacy and greater involvement in public affairs.

    While some Muslims questioned whether Gasprinskii's ideas were well suited to Islam, Gasprinskii reached a wide audience through his travels and his writings. His ideas influenced Muslim communities in Russia, Turkey, and Egypt. See also Central Asia; Modernism; Women and Reform.

    • Previous Result
    • Results
    • Highlight On / Off
    • Look It Up What is This? Highlight any word or phrase, then click the button to begin a new search.
    • Next Result
    Oxford University Press

    © 2020. All Rights Reserved. Cookie Policy | Privacy Policy | Legal Notice