We use cookies to enhance your experience on our website. By continuing to use our website, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. You can change your cookie settings at any time. Find out more Abarquh - Oxford Islamic Studies Online
Select Translation What is This? Selections include: The Koran Interpreted, a translation by A.J. Arberry, first published 1955; The Qur'an, translated by M.A.S. Abdel Haleem, published 2004; or side-by-side comparison view
Chapter: verse lookup What is This? Select one or both translations, then enter a chapter and verse number in the boxes, and click "Go."
:
  • Previous Result
  • Results
  • Highlight On / Off
  • Look It Up What is This? Highlight any word or phrase, then click the button to begin a new search.
  • Next Result

Abarquh

Source:
The Grove Encyclopedia of Islamic Art and Architecture What is This? Provides in-depth historical and cultural information on over a thousand years of Islamic art and architecture

Related Content

Abarquh

Iranian town in northern Fars province. A prosperous center in medieval times, by the 10th century it was fortified with a citadel and had a congregational mosque. The octagonal tower of mortared stone known as the Gunbad-i ῾Ali was erected, according to its inscription, by a Daylamite prince in 1056–7 to contain the remains of his parents (see Tomb, fig. 2). The Masjid-i Birun, a mosque to the south of the town, may be slightly earlier, although it has many later additions. The congregational mosque (rest.), with four iwans around a rectangular court, dates mostly to the 14th century, although the base of the dome chamber probably belongs to the 12th-century mosque. The many mihrabs within the mosque include a particularly fine stucco example (1338). There are also several mud-brick tombs in the town. These square structures have plain exteriors and plastered and painted interiors. One of the earliest is the tomb of Pir Hamza Sabzpush (12th century); the finest was that of Hasan ibn Kay Khusraw 1318; destr.). In the 18th century, the town suffered first in the Afghan invasion and then in the fighting between the Zands and Qajars.

Bibliography

  • Enc. Iran.; Enc. Islam/2: “Abarḳūh”
  • A. Godard: “Abarḳūh (Province de Yazd),” Āthār-ē Īrān, i (1936), pp. 47–72
  • D. N. Wilber: The Architecture of Islamic Iran: The Il Khānid Period (Princeton, 1955)
  • I. Afshar: Yādgārhā-yi Yazd [Monuments of Yazd], 3 vols. (Tehran, Iran. Solar 1348–54/1970–76)
  • S. S. Blair: The Monumental Inscriptions of Early Islamic Iran and Transoxiana (Leiden, 1992)
  • Previous Result
  • Results
  • Highlight On / Off
  • Look It Up What is This? Highlight any word or phrase, then click the button to begin a new search.
  • Next Result
Oxford University Press

© 2018. All Rights Reserved. Cookie Policy | Privacy Policy | Legal Notice