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Displaying: cai - cal

  • Cairo (Map) Includes map

    2. Cairo, Fustat, ground-plan of house, 9th–10th centuries: (a) central or main court; (b) secondary court; (c) iwans; (d) fountain; (e) pool; (f) sunken ...

    Source: The Grove Encyclopedia of Islamic Art and Architecture

  • Cairo (Map) Includes map

    1. Map of Cairo: (a) Babylon (Qasr al-Sham); (b) Amnis Trajani (Khalij Misri); (c) al-Fustat; (d) al-Qarafa al-Kubra; (e) al-Qarafa al-Sughra; (f) al-῾Askar; (g) ...

    Source: The Grove Encyclopedia of Islamic Art and Architecture

  • Cairo (Image) Includes image

    3. Cairo, Bab al-Nasr, 1087–92; photo credit: Sheila S. Blair and Jonathan M. Bloom ...

    Source: The Grove Encyclopedia of Islamic Art and Architecture

  • Cairo (Image) Includes image

    4. Cairo, fountain and elementary school ( sabil-kuttāb ) of ῾Abd al-Rahman Katkhuda, 1744; photo credit: Sheila S. Blair and Jonathan M. Bloom ...

    Source: The Grove Encyclopedia of Islamic Art and Architecture

  • Cairo (Image) Includes image

    6. Cairo, tomb of al-Shafi῾i, 1211; photo credit: Sheila S. Blair and Jonathan M. Bloom ...

    Source: The Grove Encyclopedia of Islamic Art and Architecture

  • Cairo (Image) Includes image

    5. Cairo, al-Azhar Mosque, 970 with later additions; photo credit: Sheila S. Blair and Jonathan M. Bloom ...

    Source: The Grove Encyclopedia of Islamic Art and Architecture

  • Cairo (Image) Includes image

    2. Cairo, mosque of Muhammad ῾Ali, 1828–c. 1857; photo credit: Sheila S. Blair and Jonathan M. Bloom; see Cairo, §III, K ...

    Source: The Grove Encyclopedia of Islamic Art and Architecture

  • Cairo (Subject Entry)

    The capital of Egypt, Cairo was founded in 969 ce by the Shīʿī Ismāʿīlī dynasty, the Fāṭimids. Its name in Arabic is al-Qāhirah, “the ...

    Source: The Oxford Encyclopedia of the Islamic World

  • Cairo (Subject Entry)

    Arabic al-Qahira (meaning “victorious”). Capital of Egypt, largest city in Africa (sixteen million inhabitants), and a major cultural, religious, and political center. Located on ...

    Source: The Oxford Dictionary of Islam

  • Cairo. (Subject Entry)

    The capital of Egypt and the largest city in both the country and the Middle East, Cairo was founded in 969 ce by the ...

    Source: Oxford Islamic Studies Online

  • Cairo (Subject Entry) Includes image

    [al-Qahira; Fr. Le Caire, Ger. Kairo; colloquial Arab. Miṣr, Maṣr]. Capital city of Egypt. Founded in 641 as al-Fustat, it was successively the seat ...

    Source: The Grove Encyclopedia of Islamic Art and Architecture

  • Cairo Declaration on Human Rights in Islam (Subject Entry)

    The Organization of the Islamic Conference (OIC) issued the Cairo Declaration in 1990 , asserting that “fundamental rights and universal freedoms in Islam are ...

    Source: The Oxford Dictionary of Islam

  • Cairo Declaration on Human Rights in Islam (1990) (Primary Source)

    Even though all but one Muslim-majority country (Saudi Arabia) ratified the Universal Declaration of Human Rights (UDHR) (1948), the generation of Islamic thinkers that ...

  • Calendar (Subject Entry)

    See Islamic Calendar . ...

    Source: The Oxford Encyclopedia of the Islamic World

  • Calendar (Subject Entry)

    See Islamic Calendar . ...

    Source: The Oxford Encyclopedia of the Modern Islamic World

  • Calendar (Subject Entry)

    See Islamic Calendar ...

    Source: The Oxford Dictionary of Islam

  • Calendar, Islamic (Subject Entry)

    In 622 the Prophet Muhammad and his followers moved from the city of Mecca to Medina, where they established the first Islamic community. This ...

    Source: The Islamic World: Past and Present

  • Calendars (Subject Entry)

    The word “calendar” refers to different systems of organizing time. In older Islamic sources, the word tārīkh was used for “calendar,” but later it ...

    Source: The Oxford Encyclopedia of Philosophy, Science, and Technology in Islam

  • Caliph (Subject Entry)

    The Arabic word khalīfah (vicegerent, deputy, or successor) is one of the titles—others included imām (leader, particularly of prayer) and amīr al-muʿminīn (commander of ...

    Source: The Oxford Encyclopedia of the Islamic World

  • Caliph (Subject Entry)

    Caliph is the title held by those who succeeded Muhammad as rulers of the Islamic world between 632 and 1924 . As Muslim heads ...

    Source: The Islamic World: Past and Present

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