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Displaying: o m - oma

  • “O My Son” (Primary Source)

    One of the genres in Islamic history is the writing of epistles or letters to those who seek spiritual knowledge or religious instruction. Although ...

    By: al-Ghazali

  • Oath (Subject Entry)

    See Ahd ; Bayah ...

    Source: The Oxford Dictionary of Islam

  • Obaid, Thoraya (Biography)

    a distinguished leader in the field of human development and women's rights. Obaid served for a decade as under-secretary-general of the United Nations and ...

    Source: The Oxford Encyclopedia of Islam and Women

  • Observation (Subject Entry)

    The term for “observation” in scientific texts from Islamic societies that corresponds best with the English is raṣd (or raṣad ), originally from Arabic. ...

    Source: The Oxford Encyclopedia of Philosophy, Science, and Technology in Islam

  • Observations of the Crusaders (1188) (Primary Source)

    When he was over ninety years old, Usamah ibn Munqidh (1095–1188) wrote his Kitab al-Iʿtibar , a memoir of his long and storied career ...

    By: Usamah ibn Munqidh

  • Observatories (Subject Entry)

    In Islamic civilization, “observatories” were known as raṣadkhana , which comes from the Arabic word raṣad (astronomical observation). An observatory was also known as ...

    Source: The Oxford Encyclopedia of Philosophy, Science, and Technology in Islam

  • Occasionalism (Subject Entry)

    A theory adopted by Ashari theology, according to which events are the result of entities whose cause is God alone. Hence any causation of ...

    Source: The Oxford Dictionary of Islam

  • Occultation (Subject Entry)

    “Hidden” state of the twelfth Shii imam. Shiis believe that during the Lesser Occultation, the imam continued to communicate with the community through four ...

    Source: The Oxford Dictionary of Islam

  • Offices and Titles: Religious, Social, and Political (Subject Entry)

    This entry provides a brief description of religious, political, and social offices and titles encountered throughout Islamic history. It relies heavily on information contained ...

    Source: The Oxford Encyclopedia of Islam and Politics

  • Official Response from the Permanent Representative of the Syrian Arab Republic addressed to the International Commission of Inquiry (2012) (Primary Source)

    In early 2011, the events of the Arab Awakening toppled longstanding dictators in Egypt, Libya, and Tunisia, and inspired calls for democracy and more ...

  • OIC (Subject Entry)

    See Organization of the Islamic Conference ...

    Source: The Oxford Dictionary of Islam

  • Oil painting (Subject Entry)

    The traditional formats for painting in the Islamic world were book illustration ( see Illustration ) and wall painting ( see Architecture , §X, ...

    Source: The Grove Encyclopedia of Islamic Art and Architecture

  • Okyay, Necmeddin (Biography)

    ( b. Istanbul , 29 Jan. 1883 ; d. Istanbul , 5 Jan. 1976 ). Turkish calligrapher . He attended the Ravzai Terakki school, ...

    Source: The Grove Encyclopedia of Islamic Art and Architecture

  • Oman (Subject Entry)

    Although a major component of Oman's distinctiveness derives from Ibāḍī Islam, it is religiously, ethnically, and geographically complex. Its estimated population of 1.5 million ...

    Source: The Oxford Encyclopedia of the Islamic World

  • Oman (Subject Entry)

    Although a major component of its distinctiveness derives from Ibāḋī Islam, Oman is religiously, ethnically, and geographically complex. Its estimated 1992 population of 1,500,000 ...

    Source: The Oxford Encyclopedia of the Modern Islamic World

  • Oman (Subject Entry)

    According to the 2010 Omani national census, the population of the Sultanate is around 3 million, and women account for half of this number. ...

    Source: The Oxford Encyclopedia of Islam and Women

  • Oman, Sultanate of (Subject Entry)

    [Arab. Saltana ῾Umān; formerly Muscat and Oman]. Independent state in the southeastern corner of the Arabian peninsula, including several islands, with its capital at ...

    Source: The Grove Encyclopedia of Islamic Art and Architecture

  • Oman, The Basic Statute of the State of (1996) (Primary Source)

    The Basic Law of the State was promulgated in November 1996 by Royal Decree. Announced by the Sultan without prior public debate, this text ...

  • Omar Khayyam (Biography)

    (d. 1131 ) Well-known author of the Rubaiyat . Arabic and Persian sources written before 1300 consistently describe him as a philosopher, astronomer, and ...

    Source: The Oxford Dictionary of Islam

  • Omar, Mullah (Biography)

    Mohammad Omar ( b. c. 1959 ), also known as Mullah Omar , is the spiritual and political leader of the Sunnī fundamentalist Taliban ...

    Source: The Oxford Encyclopedia of the Islamic World

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