Citation for Farabi, Abu Nasr Muhammad ibn Tarkhan al-

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MLA

"Farabi, Abu Nasr Muhammad ibn Tarkhan al-." In The Oxford Dictionary of Islam. Ed. John L. Esposito. Oxford Islamic Studies Online. Mar 7, 2021. <http://www.oxfordislamicstudies.com/article/opr/t125/e615>.

Chicago

"Farabi, Abu Nasr Muhammad ibn Tarkhan al-." In The Oxford Dictionary of Islam. , edited by John L. Esposito. Oxford Islamic Studies Online, http://www.oxfordislamicstudies.com/article/opr/t125/e615 (accessed Mar 7, 2021).

Farabi, Abu Nasr Muhammad ibn Tarkhan al-

(d. 950 )

Founder of Islamic political philosophy and formal logic in the Islamic world. Wrote important commentaries on Aristotle and works of philosophy, the most famous of which addresses the question of the virtuous city, characterized by division and protection of all good things among people and by the relationship between (and mutual duties of) ruler and ruled. Also synthesized the political philosophy of Plato and Islamic political thought. Integrated religion and science in written works. Understood philosophy as a quest for personal excellence, particularly in terms of intellect and moral character. Asserted that prophecy and philosophy are essentially one; the major difference is that the prophet perceives truth suddenly, by inspiration, whereas the philosopher must gain wisdom through a long and arduous struggle. A prophet possesses a special capacity to put the pure and abstract truth sought by philosophers in terms that ordinary people can understand. Revelation is thus philosophy for the masses, and prophets serve as popular examples of obedience to moral law. His views on the nature of prophecy were unpopular among religious scholars. Among his major works was The Virtuous City (Al-madinat al-fadilah).

See also Madinat al-Fadilah, al-

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